Thursday, March 15, 2012

FORCED WRITING

I’m a children’s book writer, I know that now. It took a long time to convince myself of that but in my heart, I do know that that is God’s plan for me. I never had children of my own, but have always loved them and consider myself really good with them. My nieces convinced me of that when they were little.

Even though I consider myself a writer now, I still have so many days where it’s just not in me to actually sit down and write. I’m finding that I have to be in the right frame of mind and mood. I’ve read many articles where other authors don’t believe in “writer’s block” but I sure do. I’ve had it over and over. I’ve tried forcing myself to write but it very rarely ends up working. And if I am able to actually force myself, what I write doesn’t turn out so good. So sometimes I find that it’s better for me to just walk away until another day. Maybe spend the day doing research, commenting on blogs, or other writing related projects.

Then there are those days where I’m in the mood and have a story dying to come out… I suddenly turn into a dragon on fire and nothing is more enjoyable to me than to create, edit, and finish a new story! And when I actually throw that story in the mail to a publisher, then woo hoo, I am on the moon!

Does that make me a bad writer because my writing moods are so wishy washy? What is your opinion of what makes a good writer? And for those of you who don’t believe in writer’s block and just continue to write on those days, how does your writing actually turn out… good, bad, or normal?

17 comments:

  1. I have the same exact problem. I don't write everyday either. For me, it's not so much writers block as it is lack of confidence. The more I try to force the words, the worse I feel about my writing. That can really put a damper on my creativity.

    Usually when I go back over what I've written, it's not as bad as I thought to begin with when I was in the "why bother" mood.

    I don't think because I don't write every day makes me a bad writer. It just means I still have more to learn about myself and my writing.

    Hang in there. You're not alone.

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    1. I like your way of thinking, Mariah. Thanks for that! I am going to try harder to write everyday though in some way or fashion. Now that I'm laid off from my job, I really have no excuse!

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  2. I think it's normal. At least I hope it is. My writing moods depend a lot on things happening around me. Rejection, watching people who started after me publish before me. Lots of days it feels like there is lots of criticism and no encouragement, and that makes it hard to write, but I always pull through it. Eventually.

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    1. Me too, Beth. And I think you are spot on, at least with me anyway. How much I write on a certain day really just depends on my mood and what's going on around me.

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  3. I really don't know what makes a good writer, or if I'm one (as in, a dedicated one). I do write everyday, even if it's not working on my WIP, I do freewriting everyday to cheer myself on. There are days when the writing ends up feeble, then there are hours when the writing is really satisfying.

    I'll echo Maria: Hang in there. You're not alone. :)

    And keep going, one word at a time.

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  4. I think everyone is different. For me, the more I write the easier it is to write. If I'm struggling with one MS, I'll work on another or switch scenes, jumping ahead in the story. But I write everyday because that routine works for me.

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    1. Kelly,

      Yeah, I think I just have to find a routine that works good for me. Right now, since I lost my job, I spend a lot of time feeling guilty because I'm not writing every single minute. But I'll get there.

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  5. I agree with Kelly, that routine helps me be productive. My issue is not whether I can write, but what I'm willing to work on. For example, I've promised a publisher a sequel by the end of the summer. When I did the math and factored in time for beta readers, I realized I'd need to produce 4000 words per week on this novel.

    So, what did I do? Spent two weeks writing short stories! Finally yesterday I had to force myself to work on the novel. It was painful for a few paragraphs, but then I got into it. Claudine is right: One word at a time!

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    1. Anne,

      I have not even attempted a novel yet, it's all been PB's or short stories for me. I'm not sure I'll ever find enough words to actually write a real novel!! I want to though, so maybe someday!

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  6. Some days I don't work on an actual story. Some days I work on writing blog posts a month out, or I write a poem, or I work oncover letters or queries.

    Keep plugging away with whatever works for YOU!

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  7. I try to write everyday. Well, so far this year, I've concentrated on my studies more, so the writing has taken a backseat. But now that I'm close to finishing, I can place my concentration on the writing again.

    I agree that a routine is useful, and am slowly making that dream a reality as I sort out other aspects of my life that have dominated my time over the years.

    I would like to think that one day I'll be a great writer/author not just an average to good writer.

    I think we all strive for the same thing, the difference is how and when we get there.

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  8. Well Katie and Terrie, I tried to reply to each of you separately but for some reason it wouldn't work. Anyway, I agree with you both. And Katie, I spend a lot of time answering emails, blogging, researching too and marketing my book. It all takes so much time!

    Terrie, I like you statement that the difference is how and when we get there.

    Thanks for your comments! Now let's all get back to writing!

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  9. I love to work on multiple projects at once. It's like that keeps my brain from becoming sluggish or something.

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  10. I guess, like every thing, there's a time for everything.

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  11. Nope. That does not make you a bad writer. Writers write from within whch includes all our emotions and our moods and what is going on in our lives. If we are depressed and moody we certainly can't write a decent happy children's story. Work when you feel like it in my opinion, otherwise you are just wasting your time on bad words.

    ctny

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  12. As you know...I love to write and wish I wrote more on a daily basis. But I'm like you, sometimes I do a lot of writing. I'm in the writing mode...don't mess with me. hee-hee. But then a few days may pass and I don't write a thing. I love writing and I pray I never lose the joy of writing. All though I do if full time now, I don't write 5 days a week 8 hrs a day. Writing is my day job and I love it.

    So write everytime you are lead...write the stories, make your notes of ideas...you just never know when it will be your next book. Or your next series for kids. My grandson loves the "Diary of the Wimpey Kid" series. forgive the spelling if its wrong. Just keep writing Allyn. You are a blessing to kids.
    by: Deborah Lynne www.author-deborahlynne.com

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